Wwii Munich Agreement

[Silence] An agreement signed at the Munich Conference in September 1938 handed over the German-speaking country of Sudetenland to Czechoslovakia to Germany. The agreement was reached between Germany, Italy, Great Britain and France. Czechoslovakia was not allowed to attend the conference. In March 1939, six months after the signing of the Munich Agreement, Hitler violated the agreement and destroyed the Czech state. On September 15, 1938, Benes secretly offered to sell 6,000 square kilometres of Czechoslovakia to Germany in exchange for a German agreement to accommodate 1.5 to 2.0 million South Germans that would expel Czechoslovakia. Hitler did not respond. [13] During World War II, British Prime Minister Churchill, who opposed the agreement when it was signed, decided not to abide by the terms of the agreement after the war and to bring the Sudetenland back to post-war Czechoslovakia. On 5 August 1942, Foreign Minister Anthony Eden sent Jan Masaryk the following communication: Munich Agreement (Czech: Mnichovska dohoda); in Slovak: Mnechovska dohoda; in German: Munchner Abkommen) or Munchner Verrat (Czech: Mnichovska zrada; The Slovak: Mnechovska zrada) was an agreement reached on 30 September 1938 in Munich by Nazi Germany, the United Kingdom, the Third French Republic and the Kingdom of Italy. It granted Germany the „transfer of the German territory of the Sudetenland“ from Czechoslovakia. [1] Most of Europe celebrated the agreement because it prevented the war threatened by Adolf Hitler by allowing the annexation of the Sudetenland by Nazi Germany, a region of Western Czechoslovakia inhabited by more than 3 million people, mainly German-speaking. Hitler declared that this was his last territorial claim in Europe, and the choice seemed to lie between war and appeasement. …

The solution to the Czechoslovakian problem that has just been found is, in my opinion, only the prelude to a larger colony in which all Europe can find peace. This morning I had another meeting with the German Chancellor, Mr. Hitler, and this is the document that bears his name, as well as mine. Some of you may have already heard what it contains, but I`d just like to read it to you: ` … We consider the agreement signed last night and the Anglo-German naval agreement as a symbol of the desire of our two peoples never to go to war again. [96] As the threats of Germany and a European war became increasingly evident, opinions changed.

Die Kommentarfunktion ist geschlossen.